Conference Update - GTD Roadmap, New Media, MT Communications, Office 2.0

I was recently able to attend a David Allen Getting Things Done (GTD) Roadmap seminar during one of my regular trips to Washington DC. 

It was a fabulous one-day conference. 

As someone who has been practicing some form of GTD since 2004, it was great to finally get to learn from David Allen in-person.  The Roadmap material was, frankly, excellent for someone in my situation who tries to practice GTD on a daily basis and is maturing in the model.  For instance for me, my Runway is pretty well managed, as is my Horizon's of focus above 20,000 feet. But I do struggle with Projects (10,000 feet) and consistent Weekly Reviews.  This year (2008) could be considered the year of getting a handle on both Projects & Weekly Reviews. After this seminar, I definitely think I have some good best practices to move forward with.

There are three other conferences that have my attention right now:

I will be at the upcoming New Media Expo (NME) 2008 speaking on "Getting Started With Audio Editing - Hands-on With Audacity." More information about my Audacity related resources over at AztecMedia.net/Audacity.  Christy is going to go with me this year, and we hope to get some Jersey Boys Las Vegas interviews completed for the Jersey Boys Podcast. And yes, we will be seeing the show again while we are there. ;-)

I am also planning  to attend the Manager-Tools.com Effective Communications conference in San Antonio, TX on September 9-10, 2008.  This should be a great conference and if you are a manager, you should really consider attending.  Or at the very least, go over to Manager-Tools.com Getting Started page and get started.

The other conference that is on my radar but I don't think I'm going to be able to attend is Ismael Ghalimi's Office 2.0 Conference.  David Allen is going to be giving the keynote which is great, but the line-up of other speakers is impressive, and the content seems right up my alley.  If you are interested in attending, you can save $100 off the conference fee by using this link that Ismael gave me.  For those who are GTD Connect members, David recently interviewed Ismael for the In Conversation podcast.  It is a very good podcast that examines what Ismael is up to with regards to Office 2.0, and gets deep into the personal GTD systems Ismael is deploying.  He is definitely an impressive 'cloud/virtual systems' guy.

 


Executive Staffing With Stay-At-Home Moms

Sue Shellenbarger @ WSJ.com recently had a very interesting article in her Work & Family column called "How Stay-at-Home Moms Are Filling An Executive Niche." 

I think this idea is extremely beneficial for both the consultant and the business.  The consultant gets to keep their skills current and in use. The business gets access to "C-level" expertise at an extremely reasonable rate.

Some links mentioned in the article:



"Box House" - More Options But Plan For More Mondey

The "Shipping Container" home concept from 2005 was an interesting idea.  Prefab houses/dwellings/offices have been around for along time, and for some reason I am intellectually interested in thinking about architecture items like this especially from an efficiency and cost-effectiveness standpoint.

I noticed that the WSJ.com recently published an article related to this topic entitled "The House In A Box" by Sara Lin.  The article examined three solutions: Flatpak, NextHouse, and Rocio Romero

All-in-all the 'house' part seemed to be what was expected by the owners, but the estimated up front costs of actually start-to-finish seemed to be anywhere from 20-50% off target.  So, if you are considering something like this, expect to pay more than you are being told.


Thoughts on LifeBook?!? - San Diego Self-Improvement Service

I am still trying to wrap my head around an article written by Jennifer Davies in the San Diego Union-Tribune called "Shelf Help: There's a new tool in the individual improvement library - personalized books that are made to guide you to your goals in life."

This new $4000 service is delivered over four days by LifeBook (mylifebook.com) to help participants to outline their goals in such a way that a personal book can be built summing up all that is learned and experienced during the four days of sessions.

Right now the service is available in San Diego and Chicago with future plans to expand their 'lounges' to Orange County and Los Angeles.

The article did mention three other resources:


Recommendation - Mobile Project Pouch Containers

David Allen (author of Getting Things Done) recently introduced some new mobile pouches for collecting and organizing 'stuff.'  The are in orange (so they can't be missed) and are called "Getting Zip Pouch."

I've been using an alternative from The Container Store called "Zippered Vinyl & Mesh Pouches."  I usually carry two in my backpack - one to track my Getting System File Folders, and the other to capture and store reference material.  I really like that they are semi-clear and you can see what is inside them.

I have to highly recommend them as an alternative.  They also seem to be lower in price, and you can probably pick them up at your local store.


Wild Idea Gets Some Traction: 'Personal Movie Place'

A while back on one of my runs I had this 'wild' idea that centered around a geographical social networking site that linked movie buffs to each other by enabling them to come together and watch movies that they were very passionate about in a high-end but personal cinema environment.

One of the high-level use cases was:

Sandra goes online to mypersonalmovieplace.com and signs up to "host" her favorite movie "Blade Runner" on Friday night at 8 p.m.  Other fans of "Blade Runner" in her area would be notified and then they could reserve their spots in the 10-20 seat mini-theater.  Once some minimum is met, the room is reserved, and confirmations are sent out.

This movie establishment could have 10-20 of these mini theaters in standard footprint.  The scheduling and collaboration software would be the core glue to bring it all together.  I by no means think something like this is easy to do, the legal issues are probably enough to make most people go crazy.  But when I talk to folks about it, I always get a generally favorable response.

Well ... this idea has some traction no thanks to me.  Mark Cuban and his excellent team at Landmark Theatres is doing something similar at their $20 million multiplex in West LA near Beverly Hills.

They call their rooms - Living Rooms - where a few dozen people can watch a movie in their own personal screen room with access to bar, food, concierge services, and other treats.  The tickets per seat are $11.  There are also plans for slightly bigger rooms like for 60 people that would rent out for $1500 a show.

There is no indication that you can order up the movie of your choice, but I'm sure that is something that would be doable.

The source of the information for Mark Cuban's effort was from an article in the Union-Tribune published on July 22, 2007.

If you like this idea, please feel free to use it (it is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 License).  You do have to compete with the likes of Mark Cuban.  Good luck with that.


Book Reviews: Dead Sea Scrolls, Google, Freemasonry

I finished reading several potentially interesting books during our recent family vacation trip to Vashon Island, WA:

I really have to recommend the Fields book on the Dead Sea Scrolls.  It is very well documented and historically interesting - plus it has some great pictures.  Part of the Dead Sea Scrolls are on display in San Diego (through December 2007) which is the main reason I picked up the book.

The Google book is also recommended for those interested in technology, Internet history, and business & organizational ideas.  I personally only had a minor understanding of the history, technologies, and personalities related to Google so I found this book very interesting.

The Freemasonry book was entertaining but nothing spectacular.  I enjoyed it because my father and his father were Masons, and I learned a lot about what they probably went through.  The background history was interesting and I enjoyed the humor of the author.

 


Suggestions On Having A Better Social Event Experience

Guy Kawasaki has a good list of items from Susan RoAnne to consider before you go out to a 'smoozing event'. 

I like the item '#2 Prepare For The Event' a lot.  I've had a very good recent experience doing something similar a couple of months back.

Another suggestion is to listen to Manager-Tool's podcast entitled "How to Politely Become Part of a Group." 

I have also used the recommendations in this podcast to have an overall better social experience where previously I would have felt out of place.


Privacy Thoughts - Google Vs. ISPs

There is a lot of good blogger analysis about Google's ability to drill down deep into the search world and possibly get  into trouble by not keeping personal privacy data private. 

Given Google's business model of matching people to ads, it is in their best interest to not blow this, and keep private data private.

However, there seems to be a small group of alarmists raising issue with Google's recent purchase of RSS service provider Feedburner.

I do have to disclose that I am a big fan and happy customer of Feedburner. Congrats to the team over there. 

Based on my above assertion that Google must, if they want to be successful, protect privacy, that this new found very rich data in Feedburner will get the same high-level of protection. 

Plus, I don't see any signs of Google behaving badly, and that can not be said about ISPs.

Wired recently published a piece that outlines one of my big privacy concern areas - the data ISPs can and will be collecting, and what they plan to do with it as it effects public disclosure (overt, covert, and stolen), and possible manipulation as it enters 'their' network and gets to your devices.